What if God Created Science?

God_and_ScienceI’m in over my head.  I was a music major!  Music majors generally don’t engage life scientifically…unless they’re studying 12-tone dodecaphony…and no one becomes a music major because they want to master 12-tone dodecaphony!  Growing up, I thought science was interesting, but it wasn’t an area in which I thrived. There was way too much math involved! (Quite similar to all the math required for 12-tone dodecaphony!)However, I’m to the point in my life now where the nuances, intricacies and complexities of science lead me to worship God more deeply and significantly than a “worship band” can.  Watching Discovery’s Planet Earth series causes me to bask in wide-eyed wonder at the beauty and creativity of my Creator way more than, say, The Jesus Film ever did.  And yet, I’m confronted with this idea in our society that it’s either God or science…the two are mutually exclusive.  Are they?  What if God created science?Now something I need to make clear at the outset is that I am not writing a post about the age of the universe.  This post is about how God and science aren’t mutually exclusive.  If you tend to get contentious about the age of the universe debate, this post may not be for you.Point 1 – The Kalaam Cosmological ArgumentAl-Ghazali was a 12th century Muslim theologian from Persia.  He formulated an argument regarding the world’s existence that can be summarized like this:1. Whatever begins to exist has a cause.2. The universe began to exist.3. Therefore, the universe has a cause.Through science we can observe what has taken place over the course of the universe’s existence.  We can identify and even predict causes and results by using the scientific method.  However, if we go back far enough, eventually we make observations we can’t explain the cause of or we run out of causes altogether. Scientists are left with two options:Firstly scientists can go back farther in time and make assumptions of how things happened based on the information they are able to observe and the causes they can identify.Second, they could concede that there was no cause and say things just happened naturally.  Richard Dawkins is famous for saying that we’re all atheists when it comes to Greek or Roman gods and that Atheists just take it one God further.  I’d say that Christians and others who say that God created the universe are scientists when it comes to observing how the universe works…we just take it one Cause further.Point 2 – Fine-tuningScience is wrought with examples of “fine-tuning” which make life in our universe possible.  For instance, the weak force, which is a fundamental force of nature that operates inside the nucleus of an atom, exists in such a way that an alteration in its value by even one part out of 10100 would have prevented a life-permitting universe!  A change in the cosmological constant, which drives the acceleration of the universe’s expansion, by as little as one part in 10120 would have rendered the universe life-prohibiting.  To give a little perspective, having an accuracy of even one part out of 1060 is like firing a bullet toward the other side of the observable universe, twenty billion light years away, and hitting a one-inch target!These infinitesimal numbers with potentially catastrophic results ultimately point to a Cause…even a Creator. It is too big of a leap of faith for me to believe that this finely-tuned universe we enjoy had no cause and just happened to come into existence so precisely that life was possible.Point 3 – Mutations Evolutionary science is dependent on mutations. The good mutations are naturally selected and the bad ones die off.  I have many questions and reservations regarding this theory, however it has been observed. The finches’ beaks did change right?  Even if Darwinian natural selection is how life evolved, even THAT points to a Cause, and even further, to a Creator who cares for and nurtures His creation!  Here’s how. Unpredictable and random events happen every day.  Say a fish mutates and sprouts legs for the first time. What if as it begins to walk out on land to look for something to mate with, lightning strikes and kills it…or a dinosaur accidentally steps on it…or a volcano erupts and it gets baked in hot lava.You never know what is going to happen naturally! A naturalist may come back at this argument to say that given enough time, the good mutations would naturally win out despite the random, unfortunate happenstances I just described.  I would then argue that the bad mutations would have the same amount of time to develop and that there would statistically be more of them, so who’s to say that sheer numbers of bad mutations wouldn’t win out over fewer good mutations?  Is that how we determine which ones are good then?  What if a bad mutation ends up being classified as a good mutation just because of how prolific it is? How can we be really sure what a good mutation is then?Geography even comes into play in this!  Sickle cell anemia is a good mutation for people living in areas of the world where there is a higher risk of contracting malaria but it is bad for everyone else right?  Doesn’t it make more logical sense to put our faith in a God who can personally interact with the universe He caused and lovingly guide it to survive and thrive despite its natural hardships and challenges?  Wouldn’t you do the same if you were able to create life?ConclusionI believe God created science, and science is good.  I believe He intended for us to study and use it to make sense of the universe He blessed us with.  I think doing so brings Him glory whether people intend it to or not.  I also believe, like it says in Genesis 1:27, that God made man and woman “in His own image”.One of the reasons why I believe that is because I’m enjoying writing this blog post. If part of God’s image or character is that He creates, doesn’t it make sense that we who are made in His image would delight in crafting and defending theses, writing and discussing books or blogs, researching and developing theories and worldviews, fashioning art, discovering style, building homes …composing 12 tone dodecaphony pieces?!?!I think that natural drive to create is meant to point us back to our Creator.  We were selected, but it was by the Creator of the universe who formed and fashioned our cells, chromosomes, DNA…we aren’t accidents! The complexity of our makeup screams to us that we were made on purpose by something greater than ourselves.  But it doesn’t just stop with Him being greater than His creation.When His creation, His image bearers, rejected and betrayed Him in thinking we knew how to survive and thrive without Him, rather than justly rejecting or destroying us He BECAME one of us instead. He entered His creation in order to rescue, redeem and renew it. That’s a post for another time. All I’m trying to say is that you don’t have to not choose God in order to choose science. You can choose both and get the best of both worlds.The information for points 1 and 2 was taken from Dr. William Lane Craig’s book On Guard. I am indebted to his work. You can find more of Dr. Craig’s excellent work at www.reasonablefaith.org

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